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Guidebook: Living Quarters


Charles Rex
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King's Apartments

The official state rooms of the King could be reached by the Kings Staircase in the Horn Court. They were decorated by a large collection of knights armour, swords, pikes and guns, part of the wealth of weapons amassed by Prince Rupert while he was the warden of this ancient keep. Two full suits of knights armour awaited at either side on top of the stairs.

Each room was decorated more bountiful than the next, patterned after the great palace of Louis XIV Versailles, except that the red vein marble was replaced by wood in Windsor. The walls held fine realistic carvings of fruit, fowl, game, fish and shellfish together with masterful strokes of trompe l'oeil drawing in the eye and tricking it into seeing alcoves, friezes and pillars, reaching up to the ceiling. Silver cast tables, mirrors and chairs filled the rooms, with a marble chimney in each. The ceilings were painted by Verrio into large allegoric representations of the reign of Charles II. The paint was barely dry on these magnificent paintings and were the piece de resistance of the restoration of Windsor Castle, a true masterpiece.

While more rooms exist, for the use of our game we've only listed the ones in this post.

 

Guards Room

It entered into the Guards Room, once exclusively for the Yeoman Guard and before that the Great Hall of Henry III, but now merely a room one passed through to go to the inner sanctum of court society. Southwards it opened to st. George's Hall, the Royal Library and the Kings or Royal Chapel, while westwards it led to the Kings apartments, stretching into the newly built Starbuilding (after the Star of the Garter). Military trophies continued to adorn the walls, including banners and drums. The ceiling showed Jupiter and Juno enthroned on either side of an octagonal lantern illuminating the room.

Devoid of further furniture, the Guards room only contained wooden benches.

 

The King's Presence Room

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In medieval times one could not pass without invitation to the presence room or the privy or audience room, but persons of nobility and those with business of the King now passed unhindered and crowded around in groups softly discussing politics and the latest business of the Kingdom while one awaited an invitation to the Withdrawing or for short Drawing Room.

The light of the candles was reflected in the four large silver mirrors, one for each wall. Seating had been provided in small groups of a few chairs, a side table and a loveseat, three groupings in all. The ceiling was painted with Mercury presenting a portrait of Charles II to the four corners of the world.

Going from the presence room past the not frequently used audience room one would find:

The King's State Bedchamber and Closet

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Only those the King deems family could enter without leave in the Kings Bedroom or the Kings Closet, neither of which were used as its name indicated but which were considered more limited nonetheless. To ask leave to enter one had to be a peer of the realm or a privy councillor or be invited by the King himself. Beyond these rooms were the Kings private chambers.

In his State Bedchamber ceiling Charles II sat enthroned in Garter robes with France kneeling at his feet, and the four continents paying homage to him.

The King's Private Chamber

The Kings Private Chambers included a smaller, more modest bedroom and his dining room, places where he entertained the very elite of society. The ceilings contained mythological scenes of Jupiter seducing various maidens, except the dining room which represented a feast of the gods, with red lobsters, fish and fowl carved out of wood on the pillars around the room.

 

The King's Gentlemen of the Bedchamber

Here you will find NPCs Captain Herbert & John Ashburnham

Any of the King's gentlemen of the Bedchamber without rooms elsewhere will be staying together in a room within the King's apartment. Given its location, they won't be able to entertain guests ;) 

 

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The Queen's Apartments

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The Queen's state apartments in many ways mirrored that of the King, opening up to the side of St. George's Hall through the main entrance of the palace. There was a guard room a presence room, an audience room, a drawing room, all before ever reaching the truly private apartment of the Queen.

Verrio delivered another masterwork upon the ceilings. Britannia was presented with tribute of the four continents, while on the next Lady Britannia was seated under a canopy while Envy and Sedition were chased away with the sword of justice. In the audience room Britannia in a chariot drawn by a swan being pulled towards the temple of virtue.

 

More rooms are available but we've kept to these locations for the use of our game.

The Queens Drawing Room

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The Queens Presence room, opened to all gentry and those who had business with the queen, guarded the entrance to the Queen’s Apartments.

The rich mahogany and pale green walls with bronze accents came together to make a serene and welcoming room, that looked even bigger than it was thanks to the large bronze-framed mirrors hanging on each of the walls. The Queen’s seat with a mahogany table to the left of it stands in the center of the room, surrounded by a small grouping of chairs for the Queen’s companions but there are five other small groups of seats around the room. Underneath one of the windows stands a mahogany double-row harp.

On one of the walls, between the mirrors, hangs an oil painting of a pine tree grove, the signature on the painting naming the author as the Earl of Chilchester, George Hardwick III.

 

The Queens State Bedchamber

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The opulent bedchamber, adorned in mahogany and warm red shade and numerous carefully crafted cherubs around the ceiling painting depicting Venus’ birth, displays a grand four poster bed with heavy auburn drapes elevated on one side of the room. On the opposing wall stands a large fireplace with a large mirror hanging above it, with two comfortable chairs with a sidetable between them standing before the fireplace. To the right of the room stands a small writing table with a seat.

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This is where PC's will stay. We will not list NPCs per room, only give their names per level. Your room might get an update once it has been assigned to account for some IC details. If you do not find a PC or NPC here, they may be staying by Cumberland in the Middle Ward's Round Tower.

 

 

The South Tower

 

Added to the castle in the fourteenth century by King Edward III, the South Tower obliquely overlooks the Long Walk to the southeast while offering an open view of Castle Hill to the southwest, the Round Tower to the northwest, and the quadrangle and the exterior of the state apartments to the north and northeast. Adjoining St. George's Gateway, the tower is actually two towers: one, a bullet-shaped affair of four storeys, the other a five-storeyed octagonal. The rooms within are accessible via a ground-floor entrance in the octagonal opening onto the quadrangle, or through the ground and first floors of the South Wing. The South Tower and the Octagonal Tower are connected through doors on the ground floor.

 

Like the rest of the Upper Ward, the Gothic appearance of the South Tower has been somewhat softened by warm lights and festive decor in the form of bows and seasonal greens that have been draped over the worn grey stone of the ramparts and above the door to the quadrangle.

 

 

The Ground Floor

 

Upon entering the octagonal tower from the quadrangle, one is immediately confronted by an austere stone chamber whose only features include an imposing set of stairs cut into the west wall and three small windows grouped around the entry door. The flagstones have been smoothed by centuries of footsteps pacing to and from the small door on the east wall that leads to the adjoining main tower. Torches, placed in niches cut into the walls at intervals, provide light in the darkened space. A single bench, made of well-worn oak rests against the south wall of the tower immediately opposite the oaken door leading to the inner courtyard. Thick, velvety ribbons of royal blue have been draped along the chamber’s walls to add some color to the otherwise drab surroundings, strings of silver bells tying them at intervals to hooks set into the stone surface. Dried rose petals litter the worn stone, lending their color and refreshing scent to the entrance.

 

Upon entering the main tower through the east door of the octagonal tower, one is met by a similar chamber: to the east lies the entrance to the South Wing and to the north is a moderate sized window behind the narrow stairs that lead to the chambers above. Torches light the room at night from their sconces on the grey stone walls, glimmering dully on the eternally wet flagstones below. As with the other entrance, dried rose petals, red and pink and white, litter the ground. An alcove in the south wall holds an ornately carved cherry settle that is conveniently and discreetly hidden from view by a heavily embroidered royal blue velvet curtain. Silver ribbon winds lazily around the space, punctuated at even intervals by royal blue blossoms made of velvet, in order to provide some color to an otherwise plain environment.

 

 

Octagonal Tower Reception Room

 

Through a door in the quadrangle’s stone faced entry room, there is a cozy little parlor where residents can gather and socialize, or perhaps rest before or after climbing the tower stairs. The walls were left white, but painted with a beautiful garden scene, depicting a frolicsome forest scene involving satyrs and nymphs. There are several overstuffed chairs gathered close to the fireplace and a cabinet of liquor. For the wedding, the parlor has been decorated with seasonal bouquets, bows of silver and royal blue, and a pair of taxidermy doves that seem to have been frozen mid-takeoff from the end table near the cabinet.

 

 

 

First Floor: Main Tower

The first floor is where Very Important Personages stay. On this floor you will find York & wife, the Duke of Buckingham, Duke of Newcastle & Family, Marquess of Worcester & Family, & Duc of Chevreuse

 

The first floor of the main tower is raised, piano nobile, from the ground floors and is given over entirely to a single apartment of rooms. The stairs from the ground floor lie against the two large windows in the north wall, opening onto the polished wood of the uncarpeted landing. Turning right, one is immediately presented with a second flight of stairs leading upwards, and passing this, one comes to a narrow corridor off of which is the door to the single apartment. The corridor makes a 90 degree turn at the end, proceeding for a further few feet before turning sharply again to open into the corridor of the octagonal tower. Pairs of tinkling silver bells, engraved with scenes of nymphs and satyrs have been hung on the doorknob of the apartment as well as along the balustrade and stair banisters, affixed there with silver and royal blue velvet bows.

 

Apartment of The Duke of Buckingham (& Lord Kingston)

 

The door to the apartment opened directly into the drawing room, a long, narrow space furnished in dark woods and hung with crimson damasks and silks. The bank of windows looks out over the Long Walk and Castle Hill. To the right of the windows, on the west, is a well-lighted fireplace with a carved stone coat of arms placed into the wall directly above. There is a swath of royal blue cloth draping over the mantel, a wreathe of seasonal flowers gracing the center of the swathe. Against the opposite wall is a long table surrounded by several ornate chairs. An iron chandelier hangs from the ceiling to light the chamber at night, the light glinting off the polished wooden floors.

 

Further down the west wall are two doors leading to the apartment’s bedchambers. The first chamber is furnished simply in dark green, or varying shades of the color, with green damask hangings on the mahogany bed, the verdant counterpane worked with fine silver embroidery. A tapestry depicting a boar hunt covers the door to the closet on the north wall, a fireplace crackling merrily between two moderately sized windows in the south. Near this fireplace is a small table and chair while an iron chandelier hangs from the center of the ceiling, light glinting off the polished wooden floors.

 

The second bedroom is decorated in golds, the rich earthy colors making the room feel warmer than it actually was. A fire crackled in the hearth to the north while a heavy gold velvet curtain covered the door to the closet set into the south wall. In the center of the room was an ornate mahogany bed with similarly colored hangings and counterpane; however, the bed was so high that it required the use of an ornate set of steps to climb into it. The windowless room was lighted by an iron chandelier, light glinting off the polished wooden floors.

 

Apartment of Duc of Chevreuse

 

The door opens into a narrow corridor that opens into the apartment’s drawing room. The room is furnished simply but elegantly in shades of pale green. A bank of windows along the south wall offers a view of the Long Walk and Castle Hill, letting in prodigious amounts of sunlight on a clear day. A carved rosewood writing table is placed against the windows while a handful of straight-backed chairs, cushioned in matching shades of green, are dotted throughout the room. Along the west wall is a deep-set stone fireplace that crackles merrily at all times to ward off the cold: it is draped with a swath of royal blue velvet, a wreath of seasonal flowers gracing the center of the swathe. An iron chandelier hangs from the ceiling, the light glinting off of the polished wood floors. Silver bows and bells adorn the tiebacks of the drapes..

 

To the rear of the drawing room is two doors doors; these open into the apartment's bedchambers. The smaller of the two has been finished in dark blue, the stone walls covered with a large tapestry depicting the culmination of a boar hunt. Against the north wall is a carved cherry bed hung in heavy blue damask to match the counterpane and the cushion on the single chair beside the small fireplace. Silver bells adorn the tiebacks of the bed curtains, affixed there with silver satin bows. An iron chandelier provides light in the windowless room, light glinting off the polished wooden floors. On the west wall is a small door leading into a very small closet.

 

The larger of the two bedrooms is pristine white with three small beds placed directly in the center of the chamber. The beds are distinguishable only by the differences in embroidery on the curtains and counterpanes – one red, one blue, and one green. Blossoms made of deep blue velvet adorn the tiebacks of the bed curtains, affixed there with white satin bows. Against the east wall is a small fireplace while next to the door is a small vanity table and stool. Opposite the fireplace is a door that leads into a small closet; this door is hidden behind an elegant tapestry of a beautiful young maiden with a unicorn at her feet. The windowless room is lit by an iron chandelier, light glinting off the polished wooden floors.

 

 

 

Second Floor: Main Tower

On this floor you will find Rochester, Dorset, Arlington.

 

The second floor of the main tower is much less lofty than the first and contains two bedchambers. The stairs from below split the floor, a simple railing protecting visitors from plummeting into the hole. A second flight of stairs curves from the first in a u-bend to lie against the north wall’s windows as it climbs steadily to the floor above. Turning left, one comes to the narrow corridor off of which lie the doors to two bedchambers. The corridor makes a 90 degree turn at the end, proceeding for a further few feet before turning sharply again to open into the corridor of the octagonal tower. Ribbons of royal blue velvet have been hung on the doorknob of the apartment as well as along the balustrade and stair banisters, affixed there with silver bows.

 

Apartment of Lord & Lady Mountjoy

 

The door opens into a narrow corridor that opens into the apartment’s drawing room. The room is furnished simply but elegantly in shades of pale green. A bank of windows along the south wall offers a view of the Long Walk and Castle Hill, letting in prodigious amounts of sunlight on a clear day. A carved rosewood writing table is placed against the windows while a handful of straight-backed chairs, cushioned in matching shades of green, are dotted throughout the room. Along the west wall is a deep-set stone fireplace that crackles merrily at all times to ward off the cold: it is draped with a swath of royal blue velvet, a wreath of seasonal flowers gracing the center of the swathe. An iron chandelier hangs from the ceiling, the light glinting off of the polished wood floors. Silver bows and bells adorn the tiebacks of the drapes..

 

To the rear of the drawing room are two doors; these open into the apartment's bedchambers.

 

 

Apartment of Lord Basildon & Wife

 

The apartment is small, but comfortable, with two rooms. There is a living room, with a small seating arrangement near the hearth and a table. A pair of windows is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved walnut table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a wine-colored curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

In the next room a large walnut bed resting against the east wall. The bed is hung with wine-colored velvet, the fabric trimmed with gold tassels. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small silver bells have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A pair of windows is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved walnut table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a wine-colored curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

Apartment of Lord & Lady Chichester

 

The apartment is small, but comfortable, with two rooms. There is a living room, with a small seating arrangement near the hearth and a table. A pair of windows is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved walnut table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a wine-colored curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

In the next room a large walnut bed resting against the east wall. The bed is hung with wine-colored velvet, the fabric trimmed with gold tassels. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small silver bells have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A pair of windows is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved walnut table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a wine-colored curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

The door opens into a narrow corridor that opens into the apartment’s drawing room. The room is furnished simply but elegantly in shades of pale green. A bank of windows along the south wall offers a view of the Long Walk and Castle Hill, letting in prodigious amounts of sunlight on a clear day. A carved rosewood writing table is placed against the windows while a handful of straight-backed chairs, cushioned in matching shades of green, are dotted throughout the room. Along the west wall is a deep-set stone fireplace that crackles merrily at all times to ward off the cold: it is draped with a swath of royal blue velvet, a wreath of seasonal flowers gracing the center of the swathe. An iron chandelier hangs from the ceiling, the light glinting off of the polished wood floors. Silver bows and bells adorn the tiebacks of the drapes..

 

 

Room of Mademoiselle Vauquelin

The room is small but comfortable, a large cherry bed resting against the east wall. The bed is hung with plush plum-colored velvet, ivy in silver thread crawling up the fabric. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. Two windows are set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved cherry table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a plum velvet curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

 

Room of Lady Alyth

 

The room is small but comfortable, a large cherry bed resting against the east wall. The bed is hung with plush plum-colored velvet, ivy in silver thread crawling up the fabric. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. Two windows are set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved cherry table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a plum velvet curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

 

 

 

Room of (Available)

The bedroom is small but comfortable, a large elm bed resting against the west wall. The bed is hung with coppery silk damask, silver acanthus leaves embroidered into the fabric. Across from the bed is a stone hearth. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. Two windows are set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small elm table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a copper velvet curtain with long thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

 

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Room of (Available)

The bedroom is small but comfortable, a large elm bed resting against the west wall. The bed is hung with coppery silk damask, silver acanthus leaves embroidered into the fabric. Across from the bed is a stone hearth. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. Two windows are set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small elm table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a copper velvet curtain with long thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

 

 

Third Floor: Main Tower

This is where you will find the following NPCs: Sir John Burgoyne, Sir Charles Sedley, Merriweather

 

The third floor of the main tower is nearly identical to that of the second. The stairs from the second floor lie against the two windows in the north wall, opening onto the polished wood of the uncarpeted landing. Turning right, one is immediately presented with a second flight of stairs leading upwards, and passing this, one comes to a narrow corridor off of which lie the doors of two bedchambers. The corridor makes a 90 degree turn at the end, proceeding for a further few feet before turning sharply again to open into the corridor of the octagonal tower. Small porcelain doves have been hung on the doorknob of the apartment as well as along the balustrade and stair banisters, affixed there with silver and royal blue velvet bows.

 

 

Apartment of Viscount Baintree & Mistress Wellesley

 

The apartment is small, but comfortable, with two rooms. There is a living room, with a small seating arrangement near the hearth and a table. A pair of windows is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved walnut table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a wine-colored curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

In the next room a large walnut bed resting against the east wall. The bed is hung with wine-colored velvet, the fabric trimmed with gold tassels. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small silver bells have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A pair of windows is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved walnut table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a wine-colored curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

Room of Lady Cordelia Lucas

 

It is a small but comfortable chamber, a large elm bed resting against the west wall. The bed is hung with beige silk damask, the fabric marked with a floral design in small print. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with red satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A pair of windows is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved elm table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a red velvet curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

 

 

It is a small but comfortable chamber, a large elm bed resting against the west wall. The bed is hung with beige silk damask, the fabric marked with a floral design in small print. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with red satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A pair of windows is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved elm table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a red velvet curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

Fourth Floor: Main Tower

 

The fourth floor of the main tower is nearly identical to that of the second. The stairs from below splits the floor, a simple railing protecting visitors from plummeting into the hole. A second flight of stairs curves from the first in a u-bend to lie against the north wall’s windows as it climbs steadily to the floor above. Turning left, one comes to the narrow corridor off of which lie the doors to two bedchambers. The corridor makes a 90 degree turn at the end, proceeding for a further few feet before turning sharply again to open into the corridor of the octagonal tower. Small porcelain doves and small silver bells have been hung on the doorknob of the apartment as well as along the balustrade and stair banisters, affixed there with silver and royal blue velvet bows.

 

Room of (AVAILABLE)

 

It is a small, but comfortable room, a large oak bed resting against the west wall. The bed is hung with emerald green velvet, the fabric embroidered with gold thread. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small boughs of holly have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with gold satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A pair of windows, glazed with ice, is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved oak table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a green curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

 

First Floor: Octagonal Tower

This is where Very Important Persons, Ambassadors & Dukes will stay. Here you will find the following NPCs: Duke of Norfolk & Family, Duke of Ormonde & Family, Duke of Albemarle & Wife, Duke of Lauderdale & Wife

 

Like the main tower, the octagonal tower is also raised, piano nobile. The door to an apartment is apparent on the left, to the south, while the landing and staircase leading below is directly opposite against the northwest wall, the foot of the stairs leading to the next floor located immediately to the right, against the northeast wall. Little porcelain doves and royal blue velvet bows have been hung on the doorknob of the apartment as well as along the balustrade and stair banisters, affixed there with silver bows. 

 

First Floor The Versailles Parlor

 

Inspired by the palace of the Sun King, this parlor is lavishly decorated, with gold detail bordering where the white wall meets the ceiling and the floor. There is grand fireplace on the outside wall, which provides enough heat for the entire room. Large mirrors line one wall in imitation of the hall of mirrors at Louis the XIV’s palace, creating the illusion that there is more space in the room than there really is. The large parlor is littered with end tables sporting fine vases, as well as comfortable spaces to sit and socialize. Of course, a cabinet of fine spirits is accessible to all guests in this room.

 

Apartment of Lord Athenry & Duchess of Portsmouth

 

The door to the apartment opened directly into the drawing room, a long, narrow space furnished in dark woods and hung with crimson damasks and silks. The bank of windows looks out over the Long Walk and Castle Hill. To the right of the windows, on the west, is a well-lighted fireplace with a carved stone coat of arms placed into the wall directly above. There is swathe of royal blue velvet draping the mantel, a wreath of seasonal flowers gracing the center of the swathe. Against the opposite wall is a long table surrounded by several ornate chairs. An iron chandelier hangs from the ceiling to light the chamber at night, the light glinting off the polished wooden floors.

 

Further down the west wall are two doors leading to the apartment’s bedchambers. The first chamber is furnished simply in dark green, or varying shades of the color, with green damask hangings on the mahogany bed, the verdant counterpane worked with fine silver embroidery. A tapestry depicting a boar hunt covers the door to the closet on the north wall, a fireplace crackling merrily between two moderately sized windows in the south. Near this fireplace is a small table and chair while an iron chandelier hangs from the center of the ceiling, light glinting off the polished wooden floors.

 

The second bedroom is decorated in golds, the rich earthy colors making the room feel warmer than it actually was. A fire crackled in the hearth to the north while a heavy gold velvet curtain covered the door to the closet set into the south wall. In the center of the room was an ornate mahogany bed with similarly colored hangings and counterpane; however, the bed was so high that it required the use of an ornate set of steps to climb into it. The windowless room was lighted by an iron chandelier, light glinting off the polished wooden floors.

 

Apartment of Lord & Lady Toledo

 

The door to the apartment opened directly into the drawing room, a long, narrow space furnished in dark woods and hung with crimson damasks and silks. The bank of frosty windows looks out over the Long Walk and Castle Hill. To the right of the windows, on the west, is a well-lighted fireplace with a carved stone coat of arms placed into the wall directly above. There is a swathe of royal blue velvet draping the mantel, a wreathe of seasonal blooms gracing the center of the swathe. Against the opposite wall is a long table surrounded by several ornate chairs. An iron chandelier hangs from the ceiling to light the chamber at night, the light glinting off the polished wooden floors.

 

Further down the west wall are two doors leading to the apartment’s bedchambers. The first chamber is furnished simply in dark green, or varying shades of the color, with green damask hangings on the mahogany bed, the verdant counterpane worked with fine silver embroidery. A tapestry depicting a boar hunt covers the door to the closet on the north wall, a fireplace crackling merrily between two moderately sized windows in the south. Near this fireplace is a small table and chair while an iron chandelier hangs from the center of the ceiling, light glinting off the polished wooden floors.

 

The second bedroom is decorated in golds, the rich earthy colors making the room feel warmer than it actually was. A fire crackled in the hearth to the north while a heavy gold velvet curtain covered the door to the closet set into the south wall. In the center of the room was an ornate mahogany bed with similarly colored hangings and counterpane; however, the bed was so high that it required the use of an ornate set of steps to climb into it. The windowless room was lighted by an iron chandelier, light glinting off the polished wooden floors.

 

 

 

 

Second Floor: Octagonal Tower

Here you will find the Earl of Pembroke & Family, Earl of Oxford & Family, Lord Denbigh, Lord Ranelagh, Lord Shannon, Earl & Countess of Yarmouth, Lord Feversham

Like the main tower, the second floor of the octagonal tower is not as lofty as the first. The doors to two bedchambers are apparent on the left, to the south, while the landing and staircase leading below are immediately to the right, against the northeast wall, the foot of the stairs leading up, directly opposite against the northwest wall. Silver bells and small porcelain doves have been hung on the doorknob of the apartment as well as along the balustrade and stair banisters, affixed there with navy blue velvet and silver bows.

 

 

Room of Lord Langdon

 

The chamber is small, but comfortable, a large oak bed resting against the west wall. The bed is hung with rose-colored damask, the fabric trimmed with same-color tassels. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A window is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved oak table and chair set rests to the right of the window while a small door, hidden behind a rose-colored curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

Upon arrival the following welcome hamper awaited:

  • A map of their borough;
    with a swing tag attached reading "compliments of Henrow & Ethel"
  •  

 

Room of Anne-Elizabeth

It is a small, but comfortable room, a large walnut bed resting against the east wall. The bed is hung with teal velvet, the fabric trimmed with gold tassels. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A window is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved walnut table and chair set rests to the left of the window while a small door, hidden behind a teal curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

Upon arrival the following welcome hamper awaited:

  • A map of their borough;
    with a swing tag attached reading "compliments of Henrow & Ethel"
  •  

 

Room Darlene Hamilton

The bedroom is small but comfortable, a large chestnut bed resting against the west wall. The bed is hung with blue silk damask, silver acanthus leaves embroidered into the fabric. Across from the bed is a stone hearth. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. Two windows are set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small chestnut table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a blue velvet curtain with long thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

Upon arrival a welcoming hamper awaited:

 

 

Room of Lord Chatham

 

It is a small, but comfortable room, a large walnut bed resting against the east wall. The bed is hung with teal velvet, the fabric trimmed with gold tassels. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A window is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved walnut table and chair set rests to the left of the window while a small door, hidden behind a teal curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

Upon arrival the following welcome hamper awaited:

  •  

Third Floor: Octagonal Tower

This is where the Viscounts and other Peers not listed elsewhere will stay.

 

Like the main tower, the third floor of the octagonal tower generally resembles the floor below it. The doors to two bedchambers are apparent on the left, to the south, while the landing and staircase leading below are directly opposite against the northwest wall, the foot of the stairs leading up immediately to the right, against the northeast wall. Silver bells and small porcelain doves have been hung on the doorknob of the apartment as well as along the balustrade and stair banisters, affixed there with silver and royal blue velvet bows.

 

 

Room of Lord Silverbridge

 

The bedchamber is a small, but comfortable one, a large elmy bed resting against the east wall. The bed is hung with pine green velvet, the fabric trimmed with same-color tassels. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A pair of windows is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved elm table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a pine green curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

Apartment of (AVAILABLE)

 

The apartment is small, with only a living room in between two bedrooms. There is a living room, with a small seating arrangement near the hearth and a table. A pair of windows is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved walnut table and chair set rests between the windows while a small door, hidden behind a wine-colored curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

Fourth Floor: Octagonal Tower

This is where the Gentry stays.

 

The fourth floor of the octagonal tower is nearly identical to the two previous floors below. The doors to two bedchambers are apparent on the left, to the south, while the landing and staircase leading below are immediately to the right, against the northeast wall, the foot of the stairs leading up, directly opposite against the northwest wall. Small porcelain doves and silver bells have been hung on the doorknob of the apartment as well as along the balustrade and stair banisters, affixed there with silver and royal blue bows.

 

Apartment of (AVAILABLE)

 

The livingroom is modest, including a small seating near the hearth and a desk near the window, overlooking the Great Windsor Park.

 

The bedchamber is a small, but comfortable one, a large cherry bed resting against the east wall. The bed is hung with red damask, the fabric trimmed with same-color tassels. Across from the bed is a stone hearth whose crackling fire keeps the chill at bay. Small porcelain doves have been affixed to the edges of the mantel with silver satin bows and to the tie backs of the drapes and bed curtains. A window is set into the south wall, overlooking the Long Walk and Castle Hill. A small carved cherry table and chair set rests to the right of the window while a small door, hidden behind a red curtain with thick tassels, beside the fireplace opens into a little closet. Candelabras rest on the table and mantel, casting long shadows over the polished wood of the floor.

 

 

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