Jump to content

JOIN OUR GAME!

Your Stories Await Telling

Sign in to follow this  
Louis Killington

Back at the Woolsack Later April 5th

Recommended Posts

He had not attended the Gentleman's club often enough of late, and he regretted it.  The current session of Lords had been a perfect excuse to follow up with like-minded Court Party gentlemen to hear and spread gossip.  Had there been any sighting of Danby, Louis wondered?  The King, Buckingham or the Northern Secretary would be the best to know.  Perhaps one was here.  If not, he would make conversation with those present.  One never had too many contacts or too much information.

Strolling into the library area, Basildon signaled the attendant to bring him a brandy.  His gaze swept the room.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When Basildon arrived, he would notice that his wife's step-father (by all accounts), Lord Worcester, was there with the Duke of Norfolk. Both had noticed his arrival and gave him a nod. 

 

The Duke of Buckingham was not there, although it would not be unheard of to see him there or at a coffee house following a session of Lords, so he might yet present himself. 

 

There were a few others there, but their backs were turned at the moment. It might grow busier as the evening went on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Norfolk and Worcester were good enough starting points.  "My lords," he greeted as he approached.  "Do you mind if I join you?  I am curious of what you make of the political theater we just witnessed."  He signaled a servant for a glass of brandy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Not at all," Norfolk said, gesturing to another chair.

 

"Other than Lord Exeter making himself persona non grata at court?" Worcester asked, with a chuckle. 

 

"I wonder at his reasoning for such. These delays in such matters make us look weak and ill-prepared. Unless he is being paid off..."

 

"Shaftesbury had words with Lord Rutland right after, if you noticed. Rutland is the boy's uncle. I do not think it was planned by any more experienced in Lords," Worcester added.

 

"The boy has traveled much, who knows where his allegiances are fully held after such a speech."

 

"The pup thinks to make a name for himself," Norfolk postulated. He had his own issues with his son(s), but mostly with the eldest one, as Worcester well knew. The Marquess was the boy's uncle and also the first of his illustrious name to give up the Catholic faith. But Worcester had done it decades earlier in his own youth and had never felt the current level of pressure and urgency. 

 

"And what think you of it all, Basildon?"

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Basildon sat comfortably with the two lords, both of whom outranked him.  "It was a highlight of the session," he began as he adjusted his seat.

"Perhaps he is a tool of the blond villain and Shaftesbury pretends to distance himself from it.  Perhaps Cecil comes by the view naturally by breathing those treasonous vapors in Commons for so long."  The last hypothesis was done with a smile suggesting it to be a jest.  "It could be that he thought he was being helpful, suggesting a bipartisan solution.  That is the weakness of my generation I fear.  We are more idealistic about change than more experienced courtiers who have seen the political grist mill grind aspirations into nothingness."  It was a remark that marked the 26 year old Earl as a man already growing jaded.  "Frankly, I think one of the three of us should approach the gentleman and offer to take him under wing."  It was clear that the Duke and Marquess had the better background to do so.  Louis imagined that Buckingham would be the best mentor for Exeter, but it was important for Basildon to show a willingness to work with others like Norfolk and Worcester at times.  If he was seen as nothing more than a mouthpiece for Buckingham,he would be treated accordingly.

"I do not know gentlemen but Lords seems more listless of late.  Perhaps it is because we have been consumed by funding shortfalls and not other business.  Frankly, I think this whole tawdry Danby affair has made us look weaker as well." 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Change, good God, man, have we not had enough of that in the last thirty years!" Worcester joked, chuckling. Although there was quite a bit of truth to it. The English had done quite a bit of changing and clamouring about more changing, and all it had done was made them broke, by and large. 

 

"Not waters I would tread, for  you are far more likely to gain a set of eyes in your business than change a man's principles once he has said them on grand stage," Norfolk said. 

 

"And far weaker should he have surfaced elsewhere, I think," Worcester said. "Someone is keeping him. I'm not sure which option is worse."

 

Norfolk nodded. Even their allies in this "war" were under some suspicion. Danby had grabbed the grandsons of a man who was serving a diplomatic mission with the Dutch, after all, and that was no accident. 

 

"There may be more to the Dutch than just desiring England's help in war, for those I've seen have their own suspicious countenance." Norfolk added, "I still have the Hill boys, their grandfather should have returned by now. His Majesty recalled him. When querying the Dutch, they say there is weather or reports of dangers in the channel."

 

"Perhaps the channel will swallow them up as if apparently did Danby. All on its own," Worcester commented.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Well, it has been 18 years since the Restoration and Cecil is barely older than that, so change seems more distant.  The coming and going of the CABAL seems so far away for we younger men.  Back then we cared mostly about ladies," he laughed, "as opposed to now when we think about our ladies, and politics."  It was meant as a jest.

Fortunately the subject changed smoothly to Danby.  It was one of his favorite topics to pursue these days.  "Odds are he is with the Dutch or he was intercepted by the French.  The French would use him as a game piece to trade I would think," Basildon ventured.  "I have reason to believe that Danby intended to go to the United Provinces.  They are his natural allies anyway.  If the Dutch diplomats are acting odd, the boys' grandfather has yet to return, and he has disappeared without a spotting, it would need to be Dutch doings.  My wife just returned from there and heard no word, but that is not surprising.  I would not be surprised if Orange is hiding Danby from his own English wife.  Maybe they are just giving Osborne a nice cottage in exile to keep him from his French and English enemies."

Louis was starting to wonder if Danby had kidnapped the boys to force the grandfather to tell the Dutch something.  If he thought his grandsons were held captive, perhaps the old man could be made to betray England in some way, which would be Danby's price of admission into hidden exile.  The scheme had seemed so bizarre that the Earl kept pondering different scenarios until one might make sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×