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Robert Saint-Leger

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About Robert Saint-Leger

  • Rank
    Lord Beverley

Character Information

  • Circles
    Military
    Proper Society
  • Title
    Viscount
  • INTERESTS
    Horses, horse racing, militaria, shooting, gambling
  • OCCUPATION
    Major & Aide to Prince Rupert

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  1. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    Beverley smiled and said to his friend, one of his few friends, "When one helps a friend at court, the favor need not be repaid at the time. It is a gamble and investment that you, erm, will be able to do something to help me one day. Fortunes at court are precarious things." You could be from the best family or have strong allies and connections and still be targeted by a creative enemy. "In other words, I'm not very worried about it. I think you are a good gamble." Though, if one knew Beverley, he did not have the most skill at the gambling tables! Perhaps his skill with gambles at court were more practiced. "Until then, the claret suffices," he attempted as a joke. "I do not think it will be long before others at court have an interest in you simply because you have proximity to His Majesty's children. Which is as much a thought to be on your guard than any."
  2. Robert Saint-Leger

    A Mornings Ride, April 13

    Lord Mountjoy almost spoke with too much intellectual artistry for Beverley to follow, but lucky enough Beverley laughed at the end, understanding precisely what the London population might yell. He spent enough time with duties in the Minories, and also because that was where his mistress was, that he was very experienced with inventive London verbiage. Beverley chuckled as the German delivered Sir George's regrets. "I do understand that sentiment," Beverley said. "He will be missed, though I think we can make a go of it just we three." Lord Mountjoy was masterful in his social and court skill. He complimented Von Bruhl masterfully. "Indeed, I have yet the pleasure to see them, though I have heard the Prince speak highly of them. It is good reason to look forward to the time in Windsor over recess." Beverley almost invariably went where his master went, so he would soon have opportunity to see the Saxon horses put through their paces. "A good cavalry mount is harder to breed than most give credit." His family was known for their horses as well, so he understood it was not so simple as breeding two horses together and getting what you wished. It was something which spanned equine generations.
  3. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    "More of my make?" Beverley asked. He had never considered himself the same sort of military man as those who fought with their own two hands, with true experience. "The militaristic sort, I presume. I suppose on the surface it might seem so, for His Highness is known for such pursuits, but I think he also finds those of your ilk important and useful. He might not be known for his, erm, artistic and intellectual conversation, but that does not mean he does not appreciate it." The viscount chuckled about being plied with claret and nodded, "Very much appreciated, though you need not ply me at all." (Sorry it's a bit short, but you know Bevsey and conversation. He's not the most verbose guy!)
  4. Robert Saint-Leger

    A Mornings Ride, April 13

    "A product of my family's breeding for many generations," Beverley revealed, for the Saint-Legers were also known as a horse family like Newcastle or Buckingham. "There is some, yes, for that is where he gets the pretty head." Barbs were known for their dainty, expressive faces, whereas many horses had large, strong heads. "But he is not bred to just be fast but for the steadfast temperament and agility. Running in circles is truly not very much fun in comparison to letting loose in the countryside." Racing around with obstacles and scenery was far preferable to the circle courses. "I have trained him but I did not choose his breeding. My lord father gifted him to me some years ago shortly after he was foaled. My other horse, who is too young to be of sound mind yet, was my choice of sire and mare," he revealed, as they were joined by Von Bruhl. "Good morning," he called in greeting to Von Bruhl. "And not at all. We have been enjoying some morning refreshments which are all the better out in the fresh air. Do join us. We are still expecting Sir George." Perhaps his new horse was presenting Sir George with some problems, or perhaps the minor matter Mountjoy had alluded to had delayed him. Beverley had not seen his master since Monday morning, which was not unusual, so he had not yet heard anything from Cumberland, no matter what the Prince might know.
  5. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    "But you would have to if you ever wished to go! Or I'd never think it." Beverley said, laughing at himself a bit. "I do not mind such frankness. You could always ask me anything or anything of me. I did not mean it as a, erm, rebuke." Or, at least, he did not mean for his friend to react in such a way. It was a simply thing, really. In Beverley's mind it was, at least. "We are close enough for that transparency I think!" As to scheduling, Beverley had enjoyed much the same rhythm of life for many years, even though he was barely more than a youth himself. He had never been at court without some form of position (and then his lord father's demands), so he had never felt Athenry's predicament. "Were you not in France at His Majesty's behest? That seems some sort of purpose," he said, although he did not really know much about it. "Court is ripe with opportunity for someone with your connections to the King." Even if it was through a mistress...former mistress...mother of his children? Beverley did not really know much about that either. "Is there a position you might like?" he asked. "I am no facilitator of anything, but I do know much about which personages are attached to which activities and positions, and their friends and allies." Which meant, he generally knew who needed to be cozied up to in order to achieve an end. He was no politician, but he had learned to know and understand the necessary politicking, especially because his master had little patience for it. "I could point you toward who you would need to befriend..."
  6. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    Beverley let out a contemplative hum as his friend said that his old blood would bring him respect in Versailles. The viscount was used to his father being the one to garner that level of respect, not himself. Brooke was far more impressive than Beverley, but perhaps that came with old age. "If only my French were better, my pedigree would go further." He laughed. It was about as close to a joke as one were to get out of Beverley. "Yes, although in my case that is oft a welcome thing. To feel some purpose and to be in the thick of many things, even simply as an observer. I cannot complain." Many had duties that were not glamorous or suited to them at all. Beverley at least had a position as which he could excel, with a Prince who would rather not have a flowy, excessively conversationalist and preferred things more blunt and to the point. They were uniquely suited to each other. Beverley could credit his father for that choice, for it had worked out well. No matter how much he also wished he could travel. He was yet young and now a protective heir was on the way. "Oh, are you saying that I should invite you, then?" Beverley laughed at himself. "I fear I missed that. I could take you, yes." Beverley's brown eyes watched keenly as Athenry told story of the regimented purpose of Versailles and the tidbits of marriage. "You are bored?" he asked, plainly. "I thought it more a mark of a military man to like schedules and regularity!" He tried to think of what advise to give to his friend. "There is always something to do at the palace, even just being seen in the gardens. There is an unspoken schedule of sorts but nothing like I hear of Versailles and the finger-scratching rules." Why would one scratch a door rather than have a servant knock? It was ridiculous in a French way.
  7. Robert Saint-Leger

    A Mornings Ride, April 13

    Beverley laughed at the mud of London being less desirable to wear than that of the country. It most certainly was! One would end up smelling like a farm animal or privy if one chanced any mud, especially on the lesser streets of Town. It was not so very far to get out of the city into greener areas. "Help yourself, rest assured that I have sampled them too," Beverley said. The viscount could appreciate good horsemanship, for it was one of the few things that Beverley himself did exceedingly well. It was a grand pass-time of their family. He might not have the most skilled ability in court conversation, but he very much so shined on horseback. Like Beverley, Fleet was something unexpected in ability for having a somewhat lazy disposition. Had Lord Mountjoy just called his horse darling? Now, Beverley knew that Englishmen were said to be fond of and show love only for horses and dogs by those on the continent, but...darling? He grinned a bit but did not comment on it. In truth, Beverley was not funny enough to come up with anything good to say! He wished that he was, because he recognized it as a good opportunity, but it was simply one he could not fulfill. "You have a very soft-sided horse," he complimented instead. "A very fine side-pass and pivot." He pat Fleet on the neck, "I assure you, Fleet is really quite impressive, despite appearances, as is his rider. He waits to showcase himself on the actual ride." Beverley shook his head, perfectly kept brown locks brushing over his shoulders, "Not at all. As you see, we are fully ready. All the better to sample the pies." Then he added, "There have been several odd things in the last many days, so hopefully there is no reason for the others not to join us that has come up at the palace. I know Sir George is quite depended upon by the Duke of York." Whilst Beverley knew of the Dutch plot's existence, and that they were not actually preparing to join the Dutch in war against the French, he was not privy to either the murder in the gardens nor the potential poisoning of the Queen. He simply knew that rooms that were not generally closed were closed, and because he knew of a plot against Their Majesties, he assumed the two events might be related. Their King did not generally close himself away, and the Presence Chamber was rarely cleared out and closed entirely.
  8. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    "That is a long trip, indeed," Beverley mused. He had never thought about seeing Rome or Venice or anywhere the like. He would have settled for Versailles although such a place with all its perfect expectations was an intimidating thought for Beverley, who did not like the spotlight so very much. And nor was he always the most skilled of conversationalists unless that conversation was about all things militaristic...or horses. "I should like to see France at the least," he agreed. "Though the French are so very French, and I fear I am far too much Englishman to appeal to them." There was a pause, "Whether my surname was once French or not." In fact, he knew there were still Saint-Leger (distant) cousins left in France. His Saint-Legers had come during the Norman invasion. "And I have my duties to the Lord High Admiral to consider. Any long ventures may not be possible." Prince Rupert found him very valuable and somewhat indispensable, and it had greatly benefit Beverley thus far to please his master, of whom he was also very fond in general. Beverley indicated that he would have what his friend was having. "The Woolsack is a favored place of both my father and my father-in-law," Beverley revealed with a chortle, "But surely neither could fault me for being there since they both partake of the fineries." He settled more into his seat, momentarily surveying the surroundings to see if anyone of import or interest was around. "So, properly, how have things been since I have last seen you?"
  9. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    "That is definitely true. There are surely finer places. If one wished opulent finery, the Woolsack caters to the upper eschelon of courtiers," Beverley said. "And even Kemps, at least, puts up prettier faces. Mistress Kemp's daughter is very pretty indeed." The viscount clearly fancied her. "Perhaps some day, now that there need be less concern of losing the only heir on a ship, I will see it for myself." Beverley had not done any form of grand tour on the continent. He really had not been anywhere. "A child on the way has changed some things in regards to my parents' perceptions, but I doubt much in my everyday life will be otherwise altered. A baby cannot be raised at court or in London, far too many vapors and the like in the air to chance sickness. Lady Beverley and I both have court positions which preclude us from leaving." In other words, like all nobles, he felt babies best reared in the fresh country air where they were safer. Given the importance of this child, the baby would probably be as wrapped up safely as he had been! Most likely in Maidstone at their family seat. It was not so far that frequent visits were difficult. "What is there to do with babies before they can walk and speak?" Beverley asked more rhetorically than anything. Yet another common and vastly held belief at the time. "I am more partial to a cozy corner with a friend than the most extravagant of fineries with many critical onlookers." He paused and added, "Critical onlookers that like to speak to my lord father of what I've been up to." He smiled, "I'll trade some opulence for some privacy."
  10. Robert Saint-Leger

    A Mornings Ride, April 13

    Beverley was awaiting his company in the courtyard on his seal brown horse, Fleet, who had nearly won him the races at Brighton. Losing only to the far more experienced Lord Newcastle had not been so very bad, and it had been a very close result. Unlike most horses used for racing, Fleet was not difficult to quiet or prancey as they waited. Instead the dark, gleaming horse appeared to be dozing in the brief morning glimmers of sun as his master sipped some form of drink atop his back, not even yet bothering to hold the reins. Having trained Fleet himself, the viscount was hardly worried that he might bolt, and as Lord Mountjoy entered the courtyard Fleet did little other than lift his head and open his eyes to get a good look. The horse gave a soft nicker of a greeting to the new arrival and then went back to his snooze. Beverley waved in greeting and said, "Good morning, my lord. I hope you are well." The viscount was not as fashionable as Lord Mountjoy, who was always very fashionable indeed, but he did have an amply white plumed grey hat in the same cavalier style. His lack of high fashion was not for lack of desire (or for his family's lack of money), it was for his father not trusting him not to gamble away things of great value. So instead of any fancy brocades to get muddied up on a ride, he was dressed in a deep blue velvet coat trimmed in a bit of silver, grey breeches, and shined black boots. There were blue clad servants standing by with drinks and small tarts and pies should anyone wish fortification before leaving. (OOC - sorry this got lost in the shuffle!)
  11. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    "I quite enjoy the Red Lion," Beverley replied, for in year past he had not been able to frequent her often enough to grow bored of it. Many experiences were still novel to Beverley. Experiences outside of court, that was, considering court and the palace were places he had been coming for many years now. Greater London still held boyish excitement for him in a way it did not for others. All the things that had been forbidden (and were still frowned upon to a degree) were tantalizing, and considering how close a hold Lord Brooke had exerted on Beverley after his abrupt return from university there were many such tantalizing things. Even things that seemed rather simple like coffee houses, taverns, and other such public houses. Although he did rather fancy Mistress Kemp's one pretty daughter. He had not been there in many months, before he had been married. Perhaps he would have to go soon to overhear any political mumbling that would be useful to his duties for the Duke of Cumberland. "The Duchese, I am certain, erm, enjoys her extravagant fineries," Beverley said. "I am sure you reap many such benefits." Beverley laughed in amusement at his friend's comment about his own father as he got into the carriage. "My lord father can not fail to notice with regularity that I am about to be a father myself," Beverley replied, with a snort. "Lady Beverley is not as large as Her Majesty, but she is showing enough, and the event is so wished for in my family that there are certainly benefits." Beverley was the only heir of the title in any branch of their family, so the fact that his lady wife was pregnant so quickly was a fortuitous sign for their future.
  12. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    Beverley grinned. It might have been the first time his friend had expressed being sick of books, for he was far more fond of them than Beverley. As for himself, Beverley was more well-versed on value and rarity of their family's tomes; the books on militaria were the ones he had any interest in reading. There was not much between his father's house and Whitehall, being that it was Pall Mall, but no one had ever said he was taking a straight route to his apartment at the palace! "I think I might be enticed," he joked...as well as Beverley joked. "And Lady Beverley might not be back for some time, and she might like some quiet after her duties in the Queen's household." After being in public, he often appreciated a moment to himself where nobody was placing expectations on him. Being on display was never his forte. "You are!" he laughed. "There are benefits to wives. My lord father has been forced to see me as a man. And now that I am not constantly under his eye, with a small retreat of my own, erm, there are many more liberties. Even if they are somewhat frugal ones."
  13. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    Brooke was far too perceptive of a man and far too used to Beverley's methods, but he did not say anything in front of his son's friend. Instead, he chuckled a bit and waved them off with generous gesture of the hand. "Go discuss your folio." Beverley smiled at not having to provide any detail, because he was not the best at thinking on his feet in such matters, and to his father. "Goodnight, my lord. I am likely to return to the palace, for I wish to hear anything my lady wife wishes to say when she returns from her duties." With that they took their leave. Once in the hallway and out of earshot, Beverley said, "Do you wish to actually visit the library or go elsewhere? Having a place to call my own at Whitehall, no matter how small, has freed up my constraints considerably."
  14. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    "Very well, I am very well indeed," Brooke replied. His eyes moved from Athenry to his son and then back again. "A carriage ride to Chelsea can surely be tedious," Beverley nodded along with his friend's reticence. "The book, you mean?" Beverley could not recall the last topic of their conversation on the spot, but he was intelligent enough to put something forth which would give them a reason to leave! Hopefully, his friend would play along. "And you are interrupting nothing but typical after dinner conversation." Which was true, even if the subject of it was extraordinary. "No interruption at all," Brooke agreed. "And what book is this?"
  15. Robert Saint-Leger

    Good Catholic Boys, evening, 13th April

    The new viscount was welcomed inside with familiarity by Lord Brooke's staff. One of them went to inform Lord Beverley of his friend's arrival, for the young master had dined with his parents that evening so he could speak of the strange goings-on at Whitehall afterward in his father's study. Whilst Beverley knew nothing of dead bodies or attempts on the Queen's life, he had spent too much of his life at court to not notice the increase in guards and surreptitious eyes casting sideways as if not looking. When the servant came in to tell them that Lord Athenry was there, Brooke instructed the man to show the viscount in to the study where he and Beverley were seated. "Do join us, Athenry," Brooke said as the young man arrived. "Good evening, my friend. I do hope I have not forgotten some engagement, but you are most welcome regardless," Beverley welcomed.
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